Jackie Robinson Quotes

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Jackie Robinson Quotes : QuotesMpire

A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.

Jackie Robinson

 

I’m not concerned with your liking or disliking me… All I ask is that you respect me as a human being.

Jackie Robinson

 

A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.

Jackie Robinson

 

There’s not an American in this country free until every one of us is free.

Jackie Robinson

 

I speak to you only as an American who happens to be an American Negro and one who is proud of that heritage. We ask for nothing special. We ask only that we be permitted to compete on an even basis, and if we are not worthy, then the competition shall, per se, eliminate us.

Jackie Robinson

 

The right of every American to first-class citizenship is the most important issue of our time.

Jackie Robinson

 

It kills me to lose. If I’m a troublemaker, and I don’t think that my temper makes me one, then it’s because I can’t stand losing. That’s the way I am about winning, all I ever wanted to do was finish first.

Jackie Robinson

 

This ain’t fun. But you watch me, I’ll get it done.

Jackie Robinson

 

Pop flies, in a sense, are just a diversion for a second baseman. Grounders are his stock trade.

Jackie Robinson

 

The way I figured it, I was even with baseball and baseball with me. The game had done much for me, and I had done much for it.

Jackie Robinson

 

Above anything else, I hate to lose.

Jackie Robinson

 

Life is not a spectator sport. If you’re going to spend your whole life in the grandstand just watching what goes on, in my opinion you’re wasting your life.

Jackie Robinson

 

How you played in yesterday’s game is all that counts.

Jackie Robinson

 

I guess you’d call me an independent, since I’ve never identified myself with one party or another in politics. I always decide my vote by taking as careful a look as I can at the actual candidates and issues themselves, no matter what the party label.

Jackie Robinson

 

The old Dodgers were something special, but of my teammates overall, there was nobody like Pee Wee Reese for me.

Jackie Robinson

 

In all my years of baseball, I have always expected to be traded. I never liked the idea.

Jackie Robinson

 

When I look back at what I had to go through in black baseball, I can only marvel at the many black players who stuck it out for years in the Jim Crow leagues because they had nowhere else to go.

Jackie Robinson

 

I cannot salute the flag; I know that I am a black man in a white world. In 1972, in 1947, at my birth in 1919, I know that I never had it made.

Jackie Robinson

 

Baseball is like a poker game. Nobody wants to quit when he’s losing; nobody wants you to quit when you’re ahead.

Jackie Robinson

 

In my opinion, baseball is as big a business as anything there is. It has to be a business, the way it is conducted.

Jackie Robinson

 

A new breed of Republicans has taken over the GOP. It is a new breed which is seeking to sell to Americans a doctrine which is as old as mankind – the doctrine of racial division, the doctrine of racial prejudice, the doctrine of white supremacy.

Jackie Robinson

 

I want everybody to understand that I am an American Negro first before I am a member of any political party.

Jackie Robinson

 

If I had been white with the things I did, they never would have allowed me to get out of baseball.

Jackie Robinson

 

Today, Negroes play on every big league club and in every minor league. With millions of other Negroes in other walks of life, we are willing to stand up and be counted for what we believe in. In baseball or out, we are no longer willing to wait until Judgment Day for equality – we want it here on earth as well as in Heaven.

Jackie Robinson

 

During my life, I have had a few nightmares which happened to me while I was wide awake. One of them was the National Republican Convention in San Francisco, which produced the greatest disaster the Republican Party has ever known – Nominee Barry Goldwater.

Jackie Robinson

 

I had no future with the Dodgers, because I was too closely identified with Branch Rickey. After the club was taken over by Walter O’Malley, you couldn’t even mention Mr. Rickey’s name in front of him. I considered Mr. Rickey the greatest human being I had ever known.

Jackie Robinson

 

The most luxurious possession, the richest treasure anybody has, is his personal dignity.

Jackie Robinson

 

Many people resented my impatience and honesty, but I never cared about acceptance as much as I cared about respect.

Jackie Robinson

 

I cannot possibly believe that I have it made while so many black brothers and sisters are hungry, inadequately housed, insufficiently clothed, denied their dignity as they live in slums or barely exist on welfare.

Jackie Robinson

 

It would make everything I worked for meaningless if baseball is integrated but political parties were segregated.

Jackie Robinson

 

I think if we go back and check our record, the Negro has proven beyond a doubt that we have been more than patient in seeking our rights as American citizens.

Jackie Robinson

 

Blacks have had to learn to protect themselves by being cynical but not cynical enough to slam the door on potential opportunities. We go through life walking a tightrope to prevent too much disillusionment.

Jackie Robinson

 

My problem was my inability to spend much time at home. I thought my family was secure, so I went running around everyplace else. I guess I had more of an effect on other people’s kids than I did my own.

Jackie Robinson

 

When I am playing baseball, I give it all that I have on the ball field. When the ball game is over, I certainly don’t take it home. My little girl who is sitting out there wouldn’t know the difference between a third strike and a foul ball. We don’t talk about baseball at home.

Jackie Robinson

 

After two years at UCLA, I decided to leave. I was convinced that no amount of education would help a black man get a job.

Jackie Robinson

 

I have always been grateful to Colonel Longley. He proved to me that when people in authority take a stand, good can come out of it.

Jackie Robinson

 

My protest about the post exchange seating bore some results. More seats were allocated for blacks, but there were still separate sections for blacks and for whites. At least I had made my men realize that something could be accomplished by speaking out, and I hoped they would be less resigned to unjust conditions.

Jackie Robinson

 

I had practiced with the team, and the first scheduled game was with the University of Missouri. They made it quite clear to the Army that they would not play a team with a black player on it. Instead of telling me the truth, the Army gave me leave to go home.

Jackie Robinson

 

The colonel replied that he didn’t care how my men had got the job done. He was happy that it had been accomplished. He said that, obviously, no matter how much or how little I knew technically, I was able to get the best out of people I worked with.

Jackie Robinson

 

The black press, some liberal sportswriters, and even a few politicians were banging away at those Jim Crow barriers in baseball. I never expected the walls to come tumbling down in my lifetime.

Jackie Robinson

 

I felt unhappy and trapped. If I left baseball, where could I go, what could I do to earn enough money to help my mother and to marry Rachel? The solution to my problem was only days away in the hands of a tough, shrewd, courageous man called Branch Rickey, the president of the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Jackie Robinson

 

“Baseball is like a poker game. Nobody wants to quit when he’s losing; nobody wants you to quit when you’re ahead.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“I’m not concerned with your liking or disliking me… all I ask is that you respect me as a human being.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“It kills me to lose. If I’m a troublemaker, and I don’t think that my temper makes me one, then it’s because I can’t stand losing. That’s the way I am about winning, all I ever wanted to do was finish first.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“Life is not a spectator sport. If you’re going to spend your whole life in the grandstand just watching what goes on, in my opinion you’re wasting your life.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“There’s not an American in this country free until every one of us is free.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“But as I write these words now I cannot stand and sing the National Anthem. I have learned that I remain a black in a white world.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“Above anything else, I hate to lose.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“There was never a man in the game who could put mind and muscle together quicker and with better judgment than Jackie Robinson.” — Dodgers Owner Branch Rickey

 

“We’ve got no army. There’s virtually nobody on our side. No owners, no umpires, very few newspapermen. And I’m afraid that many fans will be hostile. We’ll be in a tough position. We can win only if we can convince the world that I’m doing this because you’re a great ballplayer, a fine gentleman.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“The thing about him was that he was always doing something for someone else. I know, because he did so much for me.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“I’m not concerned with your liking or disliking me … All I ask is that your respect me as a human being.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“The right of every American to first-class citizenship is the most important issue of our time.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“Life is not a spectator sport. If you”re going to spend your whole life in the grandstand just watching what goes on, in my opinion you’re wasting your life.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“There’s not an American in this country free until every one of us is free”

Jackie Robinson

 

“Thinking about the things that happened, I don’t know any other ball player would could have done what he did. To be able to hit with everybody yelling at him. He had to block all that out, block out everything but this ball that is coming in at a hundred miles an hour and he’s got a split second to make up his mind if it’s in or out or down or coming at his head, a split second to swing. To do what he did has got to be the most tremendous thing I’ve ever seen in sports.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“I get a lot of credit and I appreciate it, but after a while, I thought of him as I would Duke Snider or Gil Hodges or anyone else. We never thought of this as a big deal. We were just playing ball and having fun.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“I’m not concerned with your liking or disliking me… All I ask is that you respect me as a human being.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“Above anything else, I hate to lose.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“Life is not a spectator sport. If you’re going to spend your whole life in the grandstand just watching what goes on, in my opinion you’re wasting your life.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“I never cared about acceptance as much as I cared about respect.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“The many of us who attain what we may and forget those who help us along the line we’ve got to remember that there are so many others to pull along the way. The farther they go, the further we all go.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“There’s not an American in this country free until every one of us is free.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“At the beginning of the World Series of 1947, I experienced a completely new emotion when the National Anthem was played. This time, I thought, it is being played for me, as much as for anyone else.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“The most luxurious possession, the richest treasure anybody has, is his personal dignity.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“Life is not a spectator sport.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“A life isn’t significant except for its impact on others’ lives.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“How you played in yesterday’s game is all that counts.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“The right of every American to first-class citizenship is the most important issue of our time.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“I guess you’d call me an independent, since I’ve never identified myself with one party or another in politics. I always decide my vote by taking as careful a look as I can at the actual candidates and issues themselves, no matter what the party label.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“The way I figured it, I was even with baseball and baseball with me. The game had done much for me, and I had done much for it.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“Baseball is like a poker game. Nobody wants to quit when he’s losing; nobody wants you to quit when you’re ahead.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“Are you looking for a Negro who won’t fight back?”

Jackie Robinson

 

“Negroes aren’t seeking anything which is not good for the nation as well as ourselves. In order for America to be 100 percent strong — economically, defensively and morally — we cannot afford the waste of having second- and third-class citizens.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“I don’t think that I or any other Negro, as an American citizen, should have to ask for anything that is rightfully his. We are demanding that we just be given the things that are rightfully ours and that we’re not looking for anything else.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“I don’t like needing anyone for anything.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“I’m not goin’ anywhere, I’m right here!”

Jackie Robinson

 

“It kills me to lose. If I’m a troublemaker, and I don’t think that my temper makes me one, then it’s because I can’t stand losing. That’s the way I am about winning, all I ever wanted to do was finish first.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“I ought to break this trophy into 32 pieces”

Jackie Robinson

 

“This ain’t fun. But you watch me, I’ll get it done.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“Relationships may change throughout the gift of time, memories stay the same forever in my mind.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“I do not believe that every person, in every walk of life, can succeed in spite of any handicap. That would be perfection. But I do believe that what I was able to attain came to be because we put behind us (no matter how slowly) the dogmas of the past: to discover the truth of today; and perhaps the greatness of tomorrow.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“I am not concerned with being liked or disliked. I am concerned with being respected”

Jackie Robinson

 

“Pop flies, in a sense, are just a diversion for a second baseman. Grounders are his stock trade.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“Next time I go to a movie and see a picture of a little ordinary girl become a great star… I’ll believe it. And whenever I hear my wife read fairy tales to my little boy, I’ll listen. I know now that dreams do come true.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“I don’t think it matters what I believe, only what I do.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“I had to fight hard against loneliness, abuse, and the knowledge that any mistakes I made would be magnified because I was the only black man out there… I never cared about acceptance as much as I cared about respect.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“I know that I am a black man in a white world. . . I know that I never had it made.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“Baseball, like some other sports, poses as a sacred institution dedicated to the public good, but it is actually a big, selfish business with a ruthlessness that many big businesses would never think of displaying.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“It’s not easy to be a martyr in the field of race relations.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“You’re going to be a great player, kid.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“I’m not concerned with your liking or disliking me… all I ask is that you respect me as a human being.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“The most luxurious possession, the richest treasure anybody has, is his personal dignity.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“The right of every American to first-class citizenship is the most important issue of our time.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“Life is not a spectator sport. If you’re going to spend your whole life in the grandstand just watching what goes on, in my opinion you’re wasting your life.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“The way I figured it, I was even with baseball and baseball with me. The game had done much for me, and I had done much for it.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“Baseball is like a poker game. Nobody wants to quit when he’s losing; nobody wants you to quit when you’re ahead.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“How you played in yesterday’s game is all that counts.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“Above anything else, I hate to lose.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“I never cared about acceptance as much as I cared about respect.”

Jackie Robinson

 

“All though I didn’t meet him. His legend and his saga and his story is just that. Jackie Robinson, we all have to tip our hat to him. Because he made the game available to guys like me.”

Jackie Robinson by Dave Winfield

 

“Jim Crow was king… and I heard a game in which Jackie Robinson was playing, and I felt pride in being alive.”

Jackie Robinson by Lou Brock

 

“I let my game do the talking. I’ve had incidents like that but when I compare my own story to the stories that have happened forty or fifty years ago particularly to Jackie Robinson for example.”

Jackie Robinson by Maurice Ashley

 

“I used to tell Jackie (Robinson) sometimes when they were throwing at him, ‘Jackie, they aren’t throwing at you because you are black. They are throwing at you because they don’t like you.”

Jackie Robinson by Pee Wee Reese

 

“After Jackie Robinson the most important black in baseball history is Reggie Jackson, I really mean that.”

Jackie Robinson by Reggie Jackson

 

“What I found fascinating was just how quickly the best of the young Negro League players were drafted into the major leagues once Branch Rickey broke the color line by hiring Jackie Robinson. It was clear that all of the major league owners already knew the talents of the black ballplayers that they had refused to let into their league.”

Jackie Robinson by Walter Dean Myers

 

“Every time I look at my pocketbook, I see Jackie Robinson.”

Jackie Robinson by Willie Mays

::Interesting Facts of Jackie Robinson::

1. Jack “Jackie” Roosevelt Robinson was born January 31, 1919, in Cairo, Ga. Shortly after his birth, his family moved and settled in Pasadena, Calif.

2. President Theodore Roosevelt, who died 25 days before Robinson was born, was the inspiration for his middle name.

3. He was the youngest of five children—Edgar, Frank, Matthew “Mack,” and Willa Mae—and grew up in relative poverty in a well-off community in Pasadena.

4. Robinson attended John Muir High School, where he was placed on the Pomona Annual Baseball Tournament All-Star Team with fellow future Baseball Hall of Famers Ted Williams of the Boston Red Sox and Bob Lemon of the Cleveland Indians.

5. He was also an accomplished tennis player, winning the junior boys singles championship in the Pacific Coast Negro Tennis Tournament.

6. Jackie’s brother Mack was an adept athlete and a splendid sprinter. He won a Silver Medal in the 200 meters behind Jesse Owens during the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany.

7. In 1942, Jackie Robinson was drafted into the Army. He was assigned to a segregated Army Cavalry unit in Fort Riley, Kansas.

8. While in the Army, Robinson became friends with boxing champion Joe Louis when the heavyweight, who was stationed at Fort Riley at the time, used his celebrity to protest the delayed entry of black soldiers in an Office Candidate School (OCS). As a result, Robinson was commissioned as a second lieutenant in 1943.

9. After an incident where he refused to sit in the back of an unsegregated bus, military police arrested Robinson at the request of a duty officer, who later requested Robinson be court-martialed. At the time of the proceedings, Robinson was prohibited from being deployed overseas to the World War II battlefronts. He never saw combat during the war.

10. Robinson was acquitted and then assigned to Camp Breckinridge in Kentucky, where he worked as an Army athletics coach until he was given an honorable discharge in 1944. During his time at the camp, Robinson was encouraged to tryout for the Kansas City Monarchs in the Negro National League.

11. In 1945, Robinson signed a contract to play for the Kansas City Monarchs. He was paid $400 a month (about $5100 today) to play shortstop and eventually was placed in the Negro League All-Star Game that year.

12. Robinson married Rachel Islum—who he had met in 1941 during his senior year at UCLA—in 1946. They had their first son, Jackie Robinson Jr., that November. The Robinsons had two more children: a daughter, Sharon, and another son, David.

13. Robinson played Minor League Baseball for the Montreal Royals in 1946, until he was called up to play for the Brooklyn Dodgers in the Major Leagues in 1947.

14. He made his Major League Baseball debut on April 15, 1947, at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York. He became the first African-American baseball player in Major League history.

15. He also won Rookie of the Year in 1947 with a batting average of .297, 175 hits, 12 home runs, and 48 runs batted in.

16. Jackie Robinson had a close friendship with Larry Doby of the Cleveland Indians, who was the first African-American baseball player in the American League. The two men broke the color barrier in baseball in the same year and would talk to each other on the telephone to share their experiences with racism during the season.

17. Dodgers teammate Pee Wee Reese defended Robinson against violent and nasty racial slurs during his rookie season. Reese famously put his arm around him and said, “You can hate a man for many reasons. Color is not one of them,” as a response to fans shouting racial slurs at Robinson.

18. On August 29, 1948, in a 12-7 win against the St. Louis Cardinals, Robinson “hit for the cycle” with a home run, a triple, a double, and then a single in the same game.

19. Robinson was the National League Batting and Stolen Bases Champion with a batting average of .342 and 37 stolen bases in 1949.

20. He was also a six time All-Star between the years 1949 to 1954.

21. In 1949, Robinson was called to testify before the United States House of Representatives’ Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC). He was subpoenaed because of comments made about him by prominent African-American actor Paul Robson. At first, Robinson was hesitant to testify, but then was ultimately compelled to do so because he feared not doing so would hurt his baseball career.

22. The National League’s Most Valuable Player Award went to Robinson in 1949, after his first appearance in the MLB All-Star Game. Robinson later took his team to the World Series, but would lose against the New York Yankees.

23. Jackie Robinson played himself in The Jackie Robinson Story, a biopic about his life released in 1950. Academy Award-nominated female actor Ruby Dee played Robinson’s wife Rachel “Rae” Isum Robinson.

24. During the off-season, Robinson went on a vaudeville and speaking tour of the South, where he would answer pre-set questions about his life. He actually made more money on these tours than he did on his contract with the Brooklyn Dodgers.

25. Robinson played in six World Series, but only won one in 1955 against the New York Yankees in a seven game series. Robinson didn’t play in 49 games that season and missed Game 7; Don Hoak played third base in Robinson’s place.

26. At 37, Robinson retired from Major League Baseball and the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1956 due to the visible effects of diabetes. Unbeknownst to the Brooklyn Dodgers, Robinson took a position with the American coffee company Chock Full O’ Nuts and agreed to quit baseball.

27. From 1957 to 1964, Jackie Robinson served as the vice president of personnel for Chock Full O’ Nuts coffee. He was the first African-American vice president of a major American corporation.

28. Robinson was a political independent, but had very conservative views on the Vietnam War. He also supported Richard Nixon in the 1960 Presidential election against John F. Kennedy, although Robinson admired Kennedy’s stance on civil rights once he was elected. He was later dismayed with Republicans for not supporting the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and soon after became a Democrat.

29. In 1962, Jackie Robinson was inducted in the Baseball Hall of Fame during his first year of eligibility. He was the first African American inducted at the Cooperstown Hall of Fame and Museum.

30. Jackie Robinson was always seen as a large figure in the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. once said Robinson was “a legend and symbol in his own time” who “challenged the dark skies of intolerance and frustration.”

31. In 1964, Robinson co-founded the Freedom National Bank—a black owned and operated bank in Harlem, New York—with businessman Dunbar McLaurin. Robinson was the commercial bank’s first Chairman of the Board. His wife later served as Chairman until 1990 when the bank closed.

32. Robinson was also the first African-American TV sports analyst. He broadcasted for ABC’s Major League Baseball Game of the Week telecasts in 1965. Robinson later worked as a part-time commentator for the Montreal Expos in 1972.

33. On June 4, 1972, the Dodgers retired Jackie Robinson’s uniform number 42, as well as Sandy Koufax’s number 32 and Roy Campanella’s number 39.

34. Robinson died of a heart attack on October 24, 1972 in Stamford, Connecticut, at age 53.

35. In 1973, Robinson’s widow, Rachel, started the Jackie Robinson Foundation, a non-profit organization that gives college scholarships to minorities. The Foundation also preserves the legacy of Jackie Robinson as a baseball player and a civil rights pioneer.

36. The house in Brooklyn, New York, where Jackie Robinson lived while he played for the Brooklyn Dodgers was declared a National Historical Landmark in 1976.

37. On March 1, 1981, American astronomer Schelte John “Bobby” Bus discovered an asteroid at the Siding Spring Observatory in New South Wales, Australia. Bus named the asteroid “4319 Jackierobinson,” after his favorite baseball player.

38. President Ronald Reagan posthumously awarded Jackie Robinson with the Presidential Medal of Freedom—the highest award given to a civilian for their contributions to world peace, cultural, or other significant public or private endeavors—on March 26, 1984.

39. You won’t see any baseball players wearing the number 42: In 1997, Robinson’s number was retired throughout Major League Baseball. This was the first and only time a jersey number had been retired throughout an entire professional sports league.

40. In 1999, Robinson was added to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team along with Cal Ripken Jr., Joe DiMaggio, Willie Mays, and Ty Cobb. Fans chose the final selections from a list compiled of the 100 greatest Major League Baseball players from the past century.

41. April 15, 2004, became Jackie Robinson Day and all uniformed players in Major League Baseball were required to wear number 42 on their jerseys to honor Robinson’s memory and legacy to the sport.

42. More than 20 years after he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, President George W. Bush also posthumously awarded Jackie Robinson with the Congressional Gold Medal—the highest honor the legislative branch can bestow on a civilian and must be co-sponsored by two-thirds of members in the House and the Senate—for his contributions to American history. He became the second baseball player to receive this accolade after Pittsburgh Pirates Right-Fielder Roberto Clemente in 1973.

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